Search

Search results: 10

RSS Subscribe to this search More...
  1. 7 Oct 2014
    Antibiotic prophylaxis for third- and fourth-degree perineal tear during vaginal birth
    Background Most women are able to give birth without serious damage to their perineum. However, severe perineal trauma, which affects the muscle or tissue in the back passage, occurs in 1% to 8% of women giving birth and is common when forceps are used. There is an increased chance of infection when this happens. Pain in this area can impact not ...
  2. 5 Feb 2014
    Hyaluronidase for reducing perineal trauma during vaginal birth
    Vaginal deliveries are associated with perineal trauma that may be unexpected tears or surgical as a result of episiotomy. Many techniques have been used to prevent perineal trauma, such as antenatal perineal massage or perineum warm compresses. Their effectiveness in reducing perineal trauma has been identified by researchers. Perineal hyaluronidase ...
  3. 8 Dec 2013
    Methods of repair for obstetric anal sphincter injury
    Ways of repairing damage to the muscles of the back passage following tearing during a difficult vaginal birth. The risk factors for obstetric anal sphincter injuries include a midline cut of the perineum (episiotomy) to facilitate the birth, forceps delivery and the baby’s back presenting posteriorly (occipito-posterior position). Most women give birth ...
  4. 26 Nov 2013
    Surgical repair versus non-surgical management of spontaneous perineal tears
    Trauma to the perineum of varying degrees constitutes the most common form of obstetric injury. The perineum is the area between the vagina and rectum which can tear during childbirth. In clinical practice these tears are often sutured. However, small tears may also heal well without surgical interference. If pain is experienced, this can result in ...
  5. 25 Sep 2013
    Re-stitching broken down perineal (the area between the vagina and back passage) wounds compared with non-stitching
    It is estimated that 350,000 women per year in the United Kingdom and millions more worldwide experience perineal stitches because of a childbirth-related natural tear or cut (episiotomy). Sometimes the perineal wound breaks down (opens up). This may be because it becomes infected, which could lead to systemic infection and sepsis. The current management ...
  6. 30 Apr 2013
    Antenatal perineal massage for reducing perineal trauma
    Antenatal perineal massage helps reduce both perineal trauma during birth and pain afterwards. Most women are keen to give birth without perineal tears, cuts and stitches, as these often cause pain and discomfort afterwards, and this can impact negatively on sexual functioning. Perineal massage during the last month of pregnancy has been suggested as ...
  7. 28 Feb 2013
    Care for pregnant women who have experienced genital cutting
    Female genital cutting (FGC) also known as female genital mutilation (FGM) or female circumcision is when some or all of a woman's or girl's external genital organs are cut or damaged for cultural beliefs, or reasons not connected with medical treatments. It is often performed by traditional practitioners such as traditional birth attendants without ...
  8. 14 Nov 2012
    Continuous and individual interrupted sutures for repair of episiotomy or second-degree tears
    Continuous stitching causes less pain than interrupted absorbable stitches when used for repairing the perineum after childbirth. When women give birth, the perineum (the area between the vaginal opening and back passage) sometimes tears or it may be necessary for them to have an episiotomy (surgical cut) to increase the size of the vaginal outlet to ...
  9. 14 Nov 2012
    Episiotomy for vaginal birth
    Vaginal tears can occur during childbirth, most often at the vaginal opening as the baby's head passes through, especially if the baby descends quickly. Tears can involve the perineal skin or extend to the muscles and the anal sphincter and anus. The midwife or obstetrician may decide to make a surgical cut to the perineum with scissors or scalpel (episiotomy) ...
  10. 16 Jun 2010
    Absorbable stitches for repair of episiotomy and tears at childbirth Podcast
    Approximately 70% of women who have a vaginal birth will experience some degree of damage to the perineum, due to a tear or cut (episiotomy), and will need stitches. This damage may result in perineal pain during the two weeks after the birth, and some women experience long-term pain and discomfort during sexual intercourse. The impact of perineal trauma ...
RSS Subscribe to this search More...