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  1. 14 Apr 2014
    Planned home versus hospital care for rupture of the membranes before 37 weeks' gestation Updated
    Premature rupture of membranes before 37 weeks’ gestation (and where there is at least an hour between membrane rupture and the onset of contractions and labour) can have consequences for both the mother and the baby. It is estimated that after premature rupture of the membranes one-half of women go into labour within a week, and three-quarters within ...
  2. 11 Apr 2014
    The effects of using of urinary catheter in women during and after a caesarean section New
    Caesaren section (CS) has become the most common obstetric surgery, with one in three of pregnant women having a caesarean delivery. The use of urinary catheters (flexible elastic tube used to drain urine from the bladder) during and after CS is routinely used with caesarean delivery. Alleged benefits of using catheters include; maintains bladder drainage ...
  3. 2 Apr 2014
    There is not enough high quality evidence to show that dietary magnesium supplementation during pregnancy is beneficial Updated
    Many women, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds, have intakes of magnesium below recommended levels. Magnesium supplementation during pregnancy may be able to reduce growth restriction of the fetus and pre-eclampsia (high blood pressure and protein in the urine during pregnancy), and increase birthweight. This review aimed to assess the ...
  4. 30 Mar 2014
    Amnioinfusion for preterm premature rupture of membranes Updated
    There is some evidence to show that restoring amniotic fluid volume with saline or a similar fluid (amnioinfusion) following preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM) may be beneficial for preterm babies (by preventing infection, lung damage and death) and mothers (by preventing infection of the womb after childbirth). However, current evidence ...
  5. 23 Mar 2014
    Terbutaline pump maintenance therapy after threatened preterm labour for reducing adverse neonatal outcomes New
    Babies born too early (preterm birth) are at high risk of poor outcomes, and the earlier they are born the greater their risk. Preterm babies are more likely to die or have serious disability as children, including cerebral palsy and other similar conditions. Women who go into very early labour (before 34 weeks) and have their contractions stopped by ...
  6. 21 Mar 2014
    Interventions for nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy Updated
    Nausea, retching or dry heaving, and vomiting in early pregnancy are very common and can be very distressing for women. Many treatments are available to women with 'morning sickness', including drugs and complementary and alternative therapies. Because of concerns that taking medications may adversely affect the development of the fetus, this review ...
  7. 27 Feb 2014
    Tocolytics for preterm premature rupture of membranes
    Preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) accounts for one-third of preterm births. Infants who are born before 37 weeks may suffer from problems related to prematurity, including death. Medications that aim to stop labor are often given in an attempt to prevent preterm birth. It is unclear whether these medications should be used in women with ...
  8. 27 Feb 2014
    Probiotics to prevent gestational diabetes mellitus
    Gestational diabetes mellitus is a condition where the mother has high blood sugar levels during pregnancy. It is associated with a range of adverse pregnancy outcomes for the mother, such as pre-eclampsia (high blood pressure with protein in the urine) and instrumental or operative delivery, as well as for the infants who may be born large-for-gestational ...
  9. 12 Feb 2014
    Treatment for excessive bleeding after childbirth
    After a woman gives birth, womb muscles contract, clamping down on the blood vessels and helping to limit bleeding when the placenta has detached. If the muscles do not contract strongly enough, very heavy bleeding (postpartum haemorrhage) can occur, which can be life threatening. These situations are common in resource-poor countries, and maternal ...
  10. 11 Feb 2014
    Preventing deep vein clots in pregnancy and after the birth
    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs when a blood clot forms in a deep vein, usually in a leg, forming a deep venous thrombosis (DVT), which may cause pain and swelling. This is very rarely fatal, but if part of the clot breaks off it may be carried to the lungs by the blood and block vessels there (this is called a pulmonary embolism (PE)), which can ...

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