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  1. 27 Aug 2014
    Haemodilution for acute ischaemic stroke Updated
    Question We wanted to compare the effectiveness of haemodilution (diluting the blood) treatment, started within 72 hours of stroke onset, versus control or no treatment in people with ischaemic stroke to assess the impact on death or dependence. Background Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide. Symptoms of stroke include face drooping, ...
  2. 22 Aug 2014
    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors versus angiotensin receptor blockers for primary hypertension
    Background Hypertension, or persistent high blood pressure above 140/90 mmHg, is a prevalent risk factor that is associated with strokes and heart disease. To prevent these events, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are used widely to treat hypertension, with ARBs often substituted for ACE inhibitors ...
  3. 13 Aug 2014
    Exercise for people with increased cardiovascular risk New
    Individuals with more than one cardiovascular risk factor, such as hypertension, high cholesterol, or smoking, are more likely to present with cardiovascular disease. While exercise has been proven to be effective in controlling individual risk factors, the evidence for its effect on multiple risks remains uncertain. We included four studies, with 823 ...
  4. 6 Aug 2014
    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor agonists for acute stroke Updated
    GABA receptor agonists are a type of neuroprotective agent that may help protect the brain in the treatment of acute stroke. This class of drugs, which includes diazepam and chlormethiazole, are traditional sedatives that have been used for several decades and have been found to be beneficial in animal models of stroke. However, the sedation effect ...
  5. 5 Aug 2014
    Length of treatment with vitamin K antagonists and prevention of recurrence in patients with venous thromboembolism Updated
    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs when a blood clot is formed in a deep vein, or when it detaches itself and lodges in the lung vessels. These clots can be fatal if blood flow to the heart is blocked. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are given to people who have experienced a VTE, to prevent recurrence. The major complication of this treatment is bleeding. ...
  6. 30 Jul 2014
    Endovenous ablation (radiofrequency and laser) and foam sclerotherapy versus open surgery for varicose veins Updated
    Varicose veins are dilated, tortuous superficial veins. When they are in the legs they can be painful, itchy or unsightly, especially when patients are standing and walking. Varicose veins are conventionally treated with surgery to remove the veins, by stripping them to the level of the knee (so-called high ligation and stripping). New less invasive ...
  7. 29 Jul 2014
    Continuous passive motion therapy for preventing venous thromboembolism after total knee replacement (arthroplasty) Updated
    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a common form of orthopaedic surgery that can improve the quality of life for patients. Patients who receive joint replacement are particularly susceptible to developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) because of tissue damage, surgical stress, immobility and muscle weakness following the surgery. ...
  8. 29 Jul 2014
    Clot-dissolving drugs for treating ischaemic stroke in the early stages Podcast Updated
    Question We wanted to compare the safety and efficacy of clot-dissolving (thrombolytic) drugs versus placebo or no treatment in the early stages of ischaemic stroke to see if clot-dissolving drugs improve outcome after stroke. Background Most strokes are due to blockage of an artery in the brain by a blood clot. Prompt treatment with clot-dissolving ...
  9. 21 Jul 2014
    Endovascular treatment for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm Updated
    The abdominal aorta is the main artery supplying blood to the lower part of the body. An abnormal ballooning and weakening of the wall of the aorta (aortic aneurysm) particularly affects men as they grow older. An aneurysm may progressively enlarge without obvious symptoms yet it is potentially lethal as the aneurysm can burst (rupture) causing massive ...
  10. 18 Jul 2014
    Exercise for reducing intermittent claudication symptoms Updated
    Intermittent claudication is a cramping leg pain that develops when walking and is relieved with rest. It is caused by inadequate blood flow to the leg muscles because of atherosclerosis (fatty deposits restricting blood flow through the arteries). People with mild-to-moderate claudication are advised to keep walking, stop smoking and reduce cardiovascular ...

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